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LSU Offers Free Child Safety Seat Installations and Inspections in Kenner

Bridget Gardner, RN, Injury Prevention Coordinator for the Interim LSU Public Hospital, demonstrates the proper installation of a child safety seat.
Bridget Gardner, RN, Injury Prevention Coordinator for the Interim LSU Public Hospital, demonstrates the proper installation of a child safety seat.

New Orleans The Louisiana Passenger Safety Task Force at the Interim LSU Public Hospital (ILH) will offer free child safety seat installations and inspections on Saturday, December 1, from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., in the parking lot of Williams Boulevard Baptist Church, 3000 Williams Blvd., in Kenner.

Nationally certified child passenger safety technicians will perform the installations and inspections to ensure that children will be protected during the busy holiday travel season and beyond. Appointments are not necessary.

This free event is an excellent opportunity for every parent with a child younger than thirteen to learn the guidelines for using rear-facing and front-facing child safety seats, booster seats and seat belts.

Correctly installed and used, child safety seats reduce the risk of death by 71 percent for infants and 54 percent for toddlers.  They reduce the need for hospitalization by 69 percent.
Correctly installed and used, child safety seats reduce the risk of death by 71 percent for infants and 54 percent for toddlers. They reduce the need for hospitalization by 69 percent.

"When children's safety seats and booster seats are installed and used correctly, they are extremely effective," said Bridget Gardner, ILH Injury Prevention Coordinator and Director of the Louisiana Passenger Safety Task Force. "They can decrease the number of injuries to children in a collision, they can reduce the severity of these injuries, and they can decrease the chance of fatalities."

The rear-facing child safety seat offers more protection and support to the infant's or toddler's head, neck and spine, distributing the collision's force over the whole body. The maximum limits of the rear-facing safety seat should determine when to switch to a forward-facing safety seat, not necessarily the child's age.

Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of children. Current child passenger-safety misuse rates in Louisiana are above 90 percent. Every day, an average of five children age 14 and younger are killed, and 548 are injured in motor vehicle crashes. Correctly installed and used, child safety seats reduce the risk of death by 71 percent for infants and 54 percent for toddlers. They reduce the need for hospitalization by 69 percent.